academic

  • Erik Wolf posted an article
    World Food Travel Association Opening for Research Librarian Intern see more

    The World Food Travel Association is looking for a research librarian intern to help sort through and organize a large library of knowledge relating to food and beverage tourism. The type of knowledge varies, from academic papers, to marketing materials and business strategies. Most of the content is written in English. The successful candidate will help us to organize and rank the materials for later use. You will not be doing any of your own original research.

    The intern should be prepared to work 10-20 hours per week for 3 months. While the internship is unpaid, the primary benefit to you is access to one of the world's largest repositories of food and beverage tourism knowledge.  You'll also have weekly meetings with the founder of the food tourism industry, which will add to your overall professional growth.

    As the world's leading authority on food and beverage tourism, the World Food Travel Association will afford you prestige and status in your career path.

    You can be located anywhere in the world. Excellent written and spoken English a must. 

    Company Summary: The World Food Travel Association is the world's leading authority on food and beverage tourism.  Founded in 2003, we are also the world's oldest and best respected such organization serving our industry.

    Location:  Virtual

    Date Posted:  06 Apr 2019

    Expiration Date:  Until filled

    How to apply:  Please send your cover letter and CV to help(at)worldfoodtravel(dot)org.

  • Erik Wolf posted an article
    Demand for education in food studies is growing. see more

    By Steve Holt As the food movement grows, the demand for college and university classes focusing on food systems is exploding. When professor Jennifer Otten stands in front of her first classes this Fall, she’ll see a student in every seat and know that the names of dozens more fill a waiting list. Each of the undergraduate courses she teaches at the University of Washington in Seattle have more than doubled since she started teaching them three years ago, outgrowing lecture halls and even attracting the attention of graduate students hoping to sit in. Continue reading the full article …